Rainbow Cloud Party Favors

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This past weekend my church had our 3rd Annual Ladies Tea party. Our theme this year was “After the Storm”, and our pastor’s wife wanted to use rainbow jellybeans as party favors. I was tasked with packaging, so I came up with a couple of different options, one with white clouds, and one representative of stormy skies.

You can watch a tutorial for both versions below or if you’d prefer a written tutorial, keep scrolling.

For the first version you will need the following:

A We R Memory Keepers Pocket Punch Board

A piece of white Cardstock cut 5x5 3/8

Adhesive

Jellybeans

A small piece of transparency film cut 2x2.5

Not shown in above pic, a Fiskars XL Cloud Squeeze Punch or other cloud shaped punch, scrap white cardstock to punch out extra clouds

Insert one 5 3/8 inch side of your cardstock into the punch board and follow the instructions printed on the board to create the pillow box.

Use the cloud punch to punch a cloud in the section farthest from the end tab.

Add adhesive to the four edges of your transparency film and adhere over the cloud shaped opening.

Add adhesive to the end tab of the pillow box and adhere shut. Close the end flaps of the box.

Punch 5-6 more clouds from your scrap cardstock and adhere around the cloud shaped window. Fill your pillow box with jellybeans and you’re done!

For the second party favor, you need the following:

A scoring board

Adhesive

A strip of gray/dark cardstock cut 2x8.5

A strip of transparency film cut 2x7.25

A small (2x3) plastic zipper bag filled with jelleybeans

A small cloud die

A die cutter

Alternately, you could cut the whole cardstock strip with a Silhouette/Cricut machine.

Score the cardstock across the long side at 3 inches, 4.25 inches, and 7.25 inches. Cut the cloud shape out of the first three inch section, just below the score line using your die cutter.

Score your transparency film at 3 and 4.25.

Crease all score lines and adhere the transparency to the cardstock, lining up the respective 3” and 4.25” score lines. Run a line of adhesive across the transparency just below unlined flap of cardstock.

If you would like to punch or cut a decorative edge in the flap, do so at this time. Add adhesive to the flap. Press the bag of jellybeans against the adhesive line on the transparency. Bring the front and back of the favor box up together, fold over the flap and adhere. All done!


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Teachers of Good Things Craft Meeting: Fall Blocks

Our quarterly Ladies Craft Meeting at Church was last month, and we made these fun wood blocks with scrapbook paper and vinyl decals. We painted the blocks first and then added scrapbook paper to the front if we wanted. I precut the vinyl on my Cameo. The cut files for the decals were purchased from Etsy shop Lilly Ashley

There are 8 different designs in the set, and it comes with a commercial license! I also created a fun name block for one of the kids’ teachers, and it was a big hit.

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Easy Cardboard Rocket Craft

This year’s Vacation Bible School curriculum was called To The Edge, and it was space themed. My sister-in-law Rachael was in charge of the decorations, and people, it was out of this world! (Bahahahaha! Snort. Okay, just ignore me) Seriously though, she did an amazing job. Check out a few of the pictures (Excuse the quality of some of them. The lighting wasn’t the best in some areas. I plan to post some of the pictures from the actual event on a later post.):

The black light hallway was a huge hit.

My mom and dad put these rockets together, and Rachael made that awesome astronaut herself!

The “computer screens” at the control panels even lit up!

This robot. How amazing is this? Of course I think the guy standing next to him is pretty amazing too. 🙂
I can’t believe how detailed everything was. Have I mentioned that she’s five months pregnant and has two kids under four? Yeah, serious supermom stuff.
Anyway, I was really surprised at the lack of VBS friendly space themed crafts out there on Pinterest. There were a lot of space themed projects, but very little that could be done with multiple kids in 20 minutes. So I wanted to share these awesome rockets we made!
This is a super quick and simple craft, even for a group, especially if you have your paper pre-cut. Materials needed are as follows:
5 inch cardstock circle
Toilet paper roll or other cardboard tube about 4 inches in height
Scrapbook paper or plain white copy paper 4×8 inches
3-4 wood half circles
Hot glue gun

At VBS we used plain white paper to wrap the rockets and let the kids color on them. You can absolutely use toilet paper rolls, but a friend at church brought me a massive bag of these heavy duty cardboard shipping tubes from his job. They were already 4 inches long, and they were perfect for this craft!

First run a line of hot glue down the side of your cardboard tube.

Glue down your paper on the short edge, wrap all the way around the rocket and glue down the other end.

Cut a slit halfway across your 5 inch circle and form into a cone shape.
Glue the cone closed.

 Run a thick line of hot glue around the rim of your tube and set the cone on top. Make sure to put it on straight, and make sure it touches the glue all the way around.

Glue on your wooden half circles as feet. (Or a stand maybe? thrusters? I don’t know.) I found these in bags of 100 pieces at Hobby Lobby. However, they were in the clearance section for about $4, so I don’t know if they stock them anymore,  but if you are making a bunch of these and can’t find the half circles, you could buy wood circles to cut in half. If you are just making one or two, you could use any number of things in their place – paper straws, popsicle sticks, short lengths of dowel rod, etc.

The kids had a blast (hehe) with these, and they were appealing to a wide age group. At VBS I had the kids glue on the paper around the side and glue the cones closed with glue sticks for safety reasons. I and another worker glued the cones to the top and glued the feet on with hot glue. I made some extras for our nursery age kids who didn’t get to participate in craft time, and they were a universal hit (ha! I can’t stop!).

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Teachers of Good Things Fabric Pumpkins

So clearly I’m making up for lost time with the posting tonight, but it’s about to get CA-RAZY up in here, so I’m doing it while I can. I mentioned a couple posts ago that we did another Walridge Baptist Church Teachers of Good Things Quarterly Craft Meeting. You know, the WBCToGTQCM for short. This month was so fun! We made fabric pumpkins, and they turned out SO CUTE!

We took our inspiration and general game plan from this post at Coastal Farmhouse, and if I can ever get my hands on some of that gorgeous snowy vintage chenille I’m going to make some just like hers!
Rachael and I hit Joann’s for supplies and went a little nuts (within the budget of course). I’m so pleased with the fabrics we ended up with! Rachael graciously took on the task of cutting all the circles out because, hello, have you met my scissor skills? She cut 2 sizes, 18 inches and 9 inches, which made roughly 12 and 6 inch pumpkins. The tutorial linked very helpfully gives you measurements for a lot more sizes. We also cut freehand leaves out of all the fabric.

This is more of a list tutorial than a photo tutorial, because I was so busy making pumpkins that I mostly got photos of finished items. But here are the basics:

Supplies:
Fabric circles in various sizes
Polyfil
Needles and thread
Deer corn
Stems/short sticks
Various embellishments like buttons and twine
Hot glue guns

Start by threading your needle, tying a large knot in the end, and sewing a loose running stitch all the away around your circle, about a half inch from the edge. Loosely gather the circle into a pouch, right side out.

Add between 1/2-1 cup of deer corn in the pouch, then fill the rest with Polyfil. Carefully pull the thread tight to close the circle at the top. Tie the thread off, then choose a stem.

Squirt a good glob of hot glue down into the top of the pumpkin, then push the stem in all the way to the bottom and twist. Hold it there for a second to let the glue set.

Add embellishments of your choice like fabric leaves, buttons, and twine.

About our supplies:

The deer corn came in a 40 pound bag from Walmart for something like $6. We had plenty left of course, but we also play cornhole at church camp every year, and the bags have to be repaired about once a year, so any excess will be used for that. Funny detail – the first bag we bought was actually half deer kibble, which we didn’t realize until we opened it up right before the event. Fortunately Walmart is about 5 minutes from the church. 🙂

You will need lots of Polyfil for this project. If you’re doing this for a group, you will probably need more than a 3lb bag.

While we did have a few real pumpkin stems, most of our stems were just short sticks Rachael gathered from around her home, and I liked them even better than the real stems. Before using, you will want to bake any natural items like this in your oven for a couple of hours at 175 degrees or so, checking every 15 minutes to make sure they don’t catch fire. This will kill any little creepy crawlies that may be hiding in the bark. Another awesome (but more expensive) option is to use a small bundle of cinnamon sticks as a stem.

The twine was just basic $1.97 a spool stuff from Walmart. We bought a 1/2 inch wooden dowel at Hobby Lobby, and I wrapped it tightly with the twine, then coated it with fabric stiffener and let it dry for 24 hours. The dowel was 36″ long, and we cut it in small sections when it was dry, but we still ran out, so I would recommend making more than you think you’ll need.

We got our buttons in big bags at Hobby Lobby for $5.99 minus the coupon savings, and I couldn’t get enough of them! (Not an affiliate link)
This craft was a huge hit, and most ladies made more than one. My mom and my sister-in-law Leah, who is the pastor’s wife, were on vacation with my dad and my brother and nephew, so I made some for them too.
These were my Mom’s.
And these were Leah’s. When she got back from vacation, she made a couple as a thank you gift for the neighbor who got their mail while they were gone.
I made these for the sweet lady who did the cooking for the event and for a dear church sister who unfortunately lost her husband the morning of the event and of course was not able to attend.
I also made some for Lily’s teachers at school for Teacher Appreciation Week, and when I went for a parent teacher meeting this week with her main teacher she had them proudly displayed on her desk and told me how much she loved them!
This was a craft that was doable for everyone, and even Lily made a couple.

We all had a great time, and they were all so different, yet all so adorable! I just couldn’t quit with them. I think I made 15 in all. The five at the top were the ones I took home, and they make me smile every time I see them. 

A few tips:
More corn means a heavier pumpkin that is going to stay put, but if your fabric is light and thin (like the muslin one above), it may show through if you add too much. Also, if your pumpkin is heavy, you will need to leave it sitting on the table while you’re pulling the thread closed at the top so you don’t break the thread. If you are making your pumpkin from burlap, it helps to tie the end of the thread to the burlap before running your stitch so that it doesn’t just pull through. Also, burlap will tend to poke out around the stem if you stitch too close to the edge, so it’s best to make your stitching line about an inch from the edge and tuck the raw edges into the top of the pumpkin before inserting your stem.
This was such a great craft, easy and inexpensive, especially if you are doing it for a group. Of course if you are just making a few for yourself and don’t want to buy a 40 pound bag of corn, you can weight them with rice, dried beans, dried pasta, or poly pellets. Or you can leave them unweighted and just stuff them with Polyfil or scrap fabric. Rachael made a few from old sweaters as a test run that were unweighted and they turned out amazing!
Hopefully we will be in a new house next Thanksgiving, and I just want to make these and put them everywhere! And I love that they can be made to match or complement any color scheme. Make up a few for your holiday decor or to take as a thank you gift for your host on Thanksgiving – there’s still plenty of time!
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Teachers of Good Things Craft Day

At my church (shout out to Walridge Baptist Church!) we have a monthly Ladies Meeting for our women’s ministry, Teachers of Good Things. Up until now it’s consisted of a potluck/Bible study combo, which has been wonderful (and tasty!). But recently we have decided to change things up a bit. We’re going in cycles each quarter, with one month being focused on missions, one month a prayer meeting, and one month…a CRAFT DAY!!!

I may have been a little excited about it. Our first craft day was this past Saturday, and I was really nervous about it because Leah, our pastor’s wife (who is also my sister-in-law and married to my brother Toby, er, our pastor) asked me to head it up. We decided to do cards this month, and Leah and I went on several crazy, madcap supply runs that may have involved various milkshakes and some total geeking out over craft tools.

I was up till I-don’t-want-to-share-this-info-with-my-husband o’clock the night before, slicing cardstock, die cutting circles, and embossing all the things I could reach. Here’s what we ended up doing:

First of all, Christmas tags. These were crazy simple. To make them, I first used my Sizzix to die cut a crap-load (that’s just for Toby, who teases me because I recently stood up to give my testimony in church and managed to include the word “crap” in it twice, because I’m way classy), anyway, a crap-load of circles from cardstock. The circles were about 1.5 inches, and I used various colors of cardstock, including some pretty shimmery red and white that we got at Tuesday Morning, 25 sheets for $1.99. All of these I embossed with winter/Christmas designs using my Sizzix Big Kick and various embossing folders. I also cut scalloped circles the same size from plain cardstock. To assemble, the ladies just used Elmer’s Glue-All to glue a scalloped circle to the back of an embossed circle, punched a hole through both layers using a hole punch, and attached either jute twine, baker’s twine, or ribbon.

Next, we did note cards, both a Christmas version and an everyday use version. This is where all my paper slicing came in. Leah and I found tons of gorgeous cardstock stacks at Tuesday Morning, Joann, and AC Moore. The stacks were all 12×12 or 6×6, and we needed the cards to measure 4×6 before they were folded. So I cut the 12×12 sheets down into six 4×6 pieces each, and just sliced 2 inches off one side of the 6×6 sheets. Those 2 inch remnants were put to use as well, which I’ll tell you about in a minute.

We folded the cards in half, then punched the front edge with Marvy Uchida Border Punches, like I did for Nick’s grandmother here. I love my border punch system, and I got one for my friend Amy for her birthday last month. She was kind enough to let us borrow it for the craft day, and Leah and I found another for the church on one of our trips to Tuesday Morning. Then I found two more on another day and snatched them up for an early Christmas gift for Leah and a birthday gift for Nick’s sister Rachael. So we had 5 to go around, but honestly we could have used twice that many.

We had all 8 different cartridges on hand, but most ladies chose the ribbon stitch one, and they had so much fun choosing pretty ribbon to weave through the slots.

The border punch does 2 inches at a time, so a four inch card was perfect. Also perfect about that size is the fact that an envelope made with a 6×6 inch sheet will fit it perfectly. We had several 6×6 stacks that we used for some of the envelopes, and I cut down a couple of 12×12 stacks for the rest. We had three of the WRMK Envelope Punch Boards on hand, and I wish we’d had more of those too. But several ladies said they planned on getting one of their own, so perhaps next time we’ll have more. 🙂

The other project we did was to turn some of those 2 inch cardstock remnants into gorgeous bookmarks using the border punches and more ribbon.

I was really afraid that it wouldn’t go well, that maybe I had too many projects planned and maybe the border punch and the envelope punch board might seem overwhelming to some. But every lady there picked right up on it within a few minutes, and the mistake pile was surprisingly small. I was also afraid that maybe they just wouldn’t enjoy it, but most of them stayed over an hour past the scheduled end time!

I’m so excited it all went so well, and I can’t wait for next quarter!

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